I’ve tried waiting for the perfect time, and it never came. So I just went for it.

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You would think that a generation of perfectionists would be hell-bent on changing the world — at all costs. That they would wake up every morning to pursue new business ventures, create new tech, amend unfair policies, build a life that suits them, and forever improve the world around them.

Until it was just as perfect as they view themselves to be.

The world needs people who are willing to look at the world around them and force their vision upon it. Without those types of people, progress is never made. …


What Liberation means for minorities in America with The Movement CEO Muqkadeen Poole.

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“Freedom has always been defined by the people in power, never by the oppressed. ”- Muqkadeen Poole

Many of American history’s victims have become its citizens. And the result has been a melting pot of cultures, struggling to coexist amongst one another. Living with a vague sense of freedom created by their oppressor.

And while we may be free of our physical chains, shackles, and encampments, we’re still haunted by a history that silently tortures us. One full of genocides, slavery, unjust wars, etc. …


Talking monetization in the underground music world.

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Most artists won’t reach superstardom, and I think the quicker you can accept that truth the quicker you’ll start to adapt your thinking into how to make a decent living off of music. -Hannibal Brumskine III

The Music industry has no middle class. You’re either a successfully signed artist or viewed as a dreamer, making music in your spare time. Which is not common in other creative industries. For example, writers, painters, and even comedians all have a fairly sustainable middle class. …


Can you actually define what you’re looking for in a job? And is that realistic?

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All experiences in life consist of peaks and valleys. You can expect to struggle at times, excel at others and experience a few low points and high moments in between. And personally, I’ve found a lot of fulfillment after I’ve finally made it through those rough patches. You can’t truly appreciate a vacation until you’ve worked your a** off for it.

No matter where you work, you probably won’t love what you’re doing on day one — or even month one. That’s the reality of it and a key aspect of working at any job that I’ve tried to relay to my fellow millennials. …


COVID-19 tried to kill our Creativity, but it failed.

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Pandemic or not, I love business and selling, that’s where my creativity lies. And Covid-19 made a valiant attempt to take it from me. There was a point there where no one would meet with me in-person. Not to mention it was impossible to cold call and get in touch with a decision-maker with everyone working remotely from home.

Most of the meeting spots were closed and the average person was afraid to be in close contact with anyone for too long. …


Entrepreneurial employees working for entrepreneurs.

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Ideally, when you hire your first few staff members they’ll be thrown into a fast-paced and everchanging environment. This means they’ll need to be able to adapt to change, complete tasks and voice their opinion and results without much guidance.

Thus as the CEO/Director or manager, your job is to create an environment where problem-solving and creativity is encouraged and rewarded highly. But also make new hires aware of the environment they’re walking into.

It’s important to explain to your staff members that not every process is set in stone. There are a lot of moving parts in a start-up and a million concerns. New processes are being tested, new ideas are being discussed and what you’re doing today may not be what you're doing tomorrow. …


Epidemics don’t create new problems they expose existing ones.

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Let’s just take a moment to admit that this is a scary time, and I for one feel vulnerable. The COVID-19 pandemic feels far more real than Ebola or any other small outbreak we’ve had in my lifetime. It feels like it’s everywhere and slowly inching toward me. And many of us don’t feel as safe as we once did. But amid all the fear and ambiguity I can’t help but wonder what lasting effect this will have on us as a country.

Epidemics don’t create new problems they just expose existing ones. Ones we’ve swept under the rug or turned a blind eye to. The issues in our face that we pretended weren’t there, but now are unavoidable. Many of us may not have a job next month. And someone that is likely a multi-millionaire either cut your hours or told you that they can’t afford to keep you. …


The goal is to learn to manage those feelings in a manner that does not affect your performance.

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The best thing to do when you’re feeling nervous or anxious during a sale is to express how your feeling to the customer. It sounds odd, but believe me, it works. It’s a great talking point and a creative way to start a conversation from nothing. “Hi, I’m new here and I’ll be helping you.” “Hello, I’m a bit nervous it’s my first day, sorry about the jittering. What can I do for you?”

Nerves are a very human thing. No one can say they’ve never experienced it at one time or another.

Overall, it’s important to know that being nervous or anxious has nothing to do with fear. You’re not in fight or flight mode, you're just overthinking. It’s a sign that you actually care about the outcome. You want to do great, you want to be successful and it’s consuming you. …


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Most people try to avoid doing business with close friends and family members. Others go as far as avoiding to even reach out to them as customers or potential clients. And honestly, when you look at all of the potential downsides, I can’t even blame them.

Some people can really stretch the limits of friendship. Occasionally, crossing that fine line between favors and taking advantage of someone. Unaware that they may be unintentionally hurting their friend’s business or potentially costing them their job.

Favors and “unplanned” friends and family discounts hurt small businesses. The stronger the relationship doesn’t mean the lower the cost. And just because you may have helped them in the past doesn’t mean you’re entitled to anything. If you’re not going to pay full price, the difference will have to come from somewhere else. …


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As someone who works for an optimist, I’ve begun to notice that positive thinking doesn’t always involve risk management. Not all of us enjoy planing for those worst-case scenarios. Mostly because that kind of thinking puts a damper on our positive energy. However, it’s a necessary evil.

You can either answer those difficult questions now or wait until life forces you to. Everything won’t always be alright.

For example, what is one of the worst possible things that could happen to each member of your start-up? Besides dying.

For instance, it’s flu season and tons of salesmen are out talking to people and meeting with clients (myself included). What if they got sick? Small companies can’t afford to be missing important people. …

About

The Corporate Slacker

A steadily evolving blog by Idris Dails. Visit our site at https://thecorporateslacker.com

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